Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Moulins Burgeois - un camion de livraison



"A miller, and much more"


Coming out of Eric Kayser one morning we found these friendly delivery men bringing in the heavy sacks of flour from Moulins Bourgeois.  We asked permission for their photos and I was fascinated by the source of the flour which is transformed into the indescribable pastries and breads of Eric Kayser and other pâtisseries/boulangeries.


The company was established in 1895 in Verdelot and today continues to produce "classic bread-making flour, traditional French flour, gruel and flour from the USA, stone ground and organic flour."  With a staff of 80 people they serve a customer base of artisan bakeries, both within 200 km of the mill and Internationally to Europe and Asia.  


At home, would I notice a flour delivery to a bakery I frequented?
Probably not, unless it was Eric Kayser, John-Paul Hévin, Julien, Pierre Hermé, Dalloyau, Ladurée, La Petite Rose, Pâtisserie des Rêves, Stohrer, Coqueliqot.... just too many to name



Eric Kayser
8, rue Monge
75005, Paris

10 comments:

Joe said...

I still have a napkin from Eric Kayzer in my coat pocket which I cannot bear to part with.

Danar O said...

While it's true they are professionals and tall and strong as bodyguards, it's curious they don't wear security industrial belts to protect backbone.
Very nice ambient portrait, including the sensation of a solid company by the truck box, carrying a valuable and pampered merchandise (as it is since food becomes in human body). Interesting exposure, you can see inside, being this a backlit photo.

Jane and Lance Hattatt said...

Hello Genie,

Well, we have to say that the delivery men look every bit as good as, no doubt, the flour is!

As the mill has been in operation for so long and have a customer base which stretches round the world, they must be doing something right. We have never been to Eric Kayseri and are now certain that we have been missing out!

Revrunner said...

Reminds me of a family member, now long past, who used to lift the bagged grain emerging from the huge granaries that dot our Pacific Northwest.

Jeanie said...

And look what you learned from that! I love seeing how all the bags are stacked. I've heard French flour has a somewhat different texture. Maybe that's why the pastries are so amazing!

William Kendall said...

I find myself wondering how heavy each bag is.

Birdman said...

I notice King Arthur Flour. That's about it. And I don't think he EVER wore shorts.

Randy said...

That's alot of flour.

Alexa said...

J and L: Yes, you have! :~}

Alexa said...

And oh the baguettes that they create with it—miam! (And thanks for leading me here daily.)