Sunday, February 19, 2012

Église St. Gervais et St. Protais II


This 17th century church, situated just to the east of Hôtel de Ville in the Marais, holds many interesting details.  The church origins trace back to the 6th century and this current structure was built in Flamboyant Gothic style.  On this bright January morning, the rows and rows of pew benches made long shadows in the patterned rug.

The church today is affiliated with the Monastic and Lay Communities of Jerusalem, which is committed to bring prayer to the city, at times that suit the schedules of working people with services beore the work day begins; during the lunch hours; and when the work day is finished.

bon dimanche


Église St. Gervais et St. Protais
Place Saint Gervais
75004 Paris

24 comments:

Randy said...

So beautiful and serene.

Señorita said...

The stain glass windows of the church are beautiful.. I think that is awesome that this prayer is focusing on prayer. There is nothing like the power of prayer...

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Chrissa said...

Really beautiful. I doubt you'd feel as though you're in the 21st century while inside that church!

Malyss said...

Those benches are quite unusual, that's the first time I see such benches in a church.I'm always impressed by the voults!

This is Belgium said...

Interesting... I am curious to find out whether in this day and age their idea of bringing working people to the church will work..
I love the pattern effect of the benches.
Bon dimanche to you too.
Mardi gras in Mobile today? or is that only in New Orleans?

Outside Looking In said...

Beautiful and I'm really taken with the pew benches....there is definitely no room for squirming!

AL said...

Although I am not religious, I have a great love of old churches, especially medieval ones. The skill with which these magnificent buildings were constructed just blows me away every time. The vaulting is magnificent as is the windows. Thanks for the post Genie. Bon Dimanche.

C. R. Spooner said...

The church's commitment shows a dedication to remaining vibrant and alive...love the sun and exposed pews.

Virginia said...

I love the stools all lined up but wouldn't want to use them for a long service!
V

Riet said...

That is a beautiful church. I really love these old churches and whereever I am and I see one I will enter it. The stools are a bit strange don't you think?
Have a nice Sunday

Sylvia K said...

Looking at this photo is like stepping back hundreds of years in time and I can only imagine what actually being there would be like! The vaulting is indeed magnificent! The benches/stools are amazing -- wouldn't want to use them during a long service either. And like Al, the skill that it took to create this and others from the same era is mind boggling! Superb post and capture for the day, Genie!

Hugs
Sylvia

Alexa said...

I love the little stools—they're keeping a nice low profile in this majestic church. I hope the thoughtfully scheduled services keep them well-filled (and that the worshippers all have a strong back).

Kristin said...

Wow, great building!

xx

M said...

Just beautifully light and airy! I love the idea of adjustIng the schedule in order to reach more people.

Harriet said...

Lovely photo to counterbalance this rainy Sunday in Charleston.

Kris said...

Gorgeous church and beautiful stained glass windows. Just peering in, this church emits a sense of calm and peacefulness.

Starman said...

Pretty. We used to get the bus just outside of Saint-Gervais.

Loree said...

What a lovely light-filled church. I hate gloomy churches.

Birdman said...

The stools 'cry' out monastery.

Jack said...

This one is exceptional, Genie. Color . . . form . . . unique tilting perspective . . . the foreground benches. Good work.

Louis la Vache said...

«Louis» knows exactly where this church is. After seeing your images of it, he regrets that he never went in - it was very close to where he lived in Paris...
(sigh)
He appreciates your posting about this church.

Peter Olson said...

Glad you talk about this church, perhaps not so much visited by "tourists", but just beautiful and the music and special singing during masses is already worth a visit. This church was also the "home" (the organ) for one of the most famous French music families, Couperin.

Sam @ My Carolina Kitchen said...

What a beautiful church. Sometimes I have a hard time wrapping my head around the fact that something is from the 17th century. Just amazing it's survived.
Sam

Mike said...

Churches have some of the best designs.