Monday, September 10, 2012

La salamandre et le maïs - art nouveau



This interesting motif of a salamander eating a stalk of corn is found on Rue de Grenelle.  The art nouveau double door is part of pair, each with a salamander.  Apparently, this greedy one got the corn.

The building was designed by architect Jules Lavirotte in 1898, his first major building.  The façade, influenced by the French Rococo style, offers only hints of the theatrical displays for which Lavirotte was to become known.  He designed at least nine buildings still standing in the 7ième arrondissement.



151, rue de Grenelle
75007, Paris
Métro La Tour-Maubourg


23 comments:

Kristie Franklin said...

Interesting motif...I really don't know what to make of it? HAH :)

Have a great week Genie!

Sylvia K said...

It is interesting and well done, but I don't know exactly what to make of it either!!! Things like this make me wonder what was going on in the artists/architect's mind! Fun! Enjoy your week, Genie!

Hugs
Sylvia

Jane and Lance Hattatt said...

Hello Genie:
It is, we think, the grace, style and fluidity of this detail of a doorway which makes it so very appealing. There is enormous movement to be found in every line one looks at and we can imagine how wonderful the pair of doors must be seen as a whole.

Vreni said...

Interesting detail!

Loulou in France said...

That is so cool! The details on Parisian buildings just amaze me.

Cezar and Léia said...

Amazing detail!I'm always delighted with your beautiful shots!
Léia

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

You have an artistic eye. This is a superb photo of a great subject. Keep well. Diane

Merisi said...

Unique detail, never seen corn on the cob eaten by a salamander! ;-)

AL said...

Very interesting...I wonder if it has some significance? Perhaps M. Lavirotte just liked salamanders as he has used them on some of his other works.

M said...

What an incredible eye for detail you have!

biebkriebels said...

Very nice artpiece!

Anna said...

Interestingly, I've noticed that the salamander on the right hand side of the doors at 151 Rue de Grenelle is identical to the central door handle at 29 Avenue Rapp, which Lavirotte completed three years later. I haven't noticed it on any of his other buildings, but it's exactly the same, right down to the tail curling around; I wonder if he used it anywhere else? (to show the two doors, in case anybody else is interested in the repetition: http://lookitsanna.tumblr.com/post/31266561344/left-151-rue-de-grenelle-1898-right-29-avenue)

Your photo is lovely; you capture the textures of the door beautifully.

xx Anna

Ruth said...

I've never seen such a motif before. I wonder what the origin is.

Lisa Graham Art said...

Bet his sketchbook is really an interesting sight to see. They just don't make buildings like this any more. It's really too bad.

Alexa said...

Love it when you focus on the details, Genie—and I have to agree with Lisa Graham. But at least they keep beautiful buildings they have (unlike here in NYC).

Loree said...

What an interesting sculpture. I love it when you focus on the details.

Louise said...

What gorgeous detail! Well done for noticing.

Peter Olson said...

Nobody can be more art nouveau than Lavirotte! :-)

Virginia said...

I saw the title and thought, "salamander and corn? Oh I've messed up my French again. NOT!!! :)
V

Randy said...

Very interesting work.

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

Anna, thank you for the link to the full shot of the doors and for the Ave Rapp doors as well. I will be posting the Rapp residence on a future post. His work is quite interesting. Oh, and I enjoyed the little reflected self-portrait as well!

Lisa, you would certainly be aware of a sketch book. I wonder if those were saved... so interesting I would imagine.

Ruth, I do know that he used some interesting motifs and he did repeat the salamander in several of his buildings. I am still researching.

Merisi, your comment made me laugh!

On my next trip I hope to see more of his buildings and to learn more about his later work and designs.

Bises,
Genie

Mary said...

Wonderful! I've never seen anything quite like this before. Love love love it. And you capture it perfectly!

Ken Mac said...

rather outrageous!