Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Caryatids in Paris


These caryatids* are high above the street level on Rue de Provence and support the balcony of the deuxième étage.  Although this building does not have the architect's name and date of construction like my previous post, one might guess that this building was designed late 19th or early 20th century.  Well, after looking at many of these caryatids and two architecture books, one can see that this Greek influence has been felt for centuries.   The earliest known examples are seen in the treasuries of Delphi (6th century BC) and the Caryatid Porch of the Erechtheion on the Acropolis in Athens.

The caryatids are by Édouard Lormier (1847-1919) who made his debut at the Salon in 1886.  He specialized in evocative works of the Art Deco era and is best known for his figures of beautiful women in flowing drapes. (Thank you detective Malyss) 


*caryatid -A sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar

73, rue de Provence
(at Rue Chassée d'antin)
75009 Paris

26 comments:

martinealison said...

Je ne connais pas la date de ce bâtiment, mais je suis toujours éblouie par une si belle architecture...
gros bisous

Malyss said...

At least you've got the name of the sculptor of the caryatids: Lormier(written on the left one). They are very beautyful and elegant. Noone would build such great things anymore today..:(

Paris Paul said...

A woman's work is truly never done...

Viennese Girl Vreni said...

I love caryatids! And atlantes even more ;-) We have a lot of them in Vienna.

Joe said...

Would love to sit this window aver un cafe au lait and watch the city go by.

winterludes said...

about 1887-1888. after the grands boulevards construction. these caryatids seem to be the only edmond lormier did.
did you see agnes varda's movie about "les dites cariatides"? very boring but interesting.

Elizabeth Eiffel said...

One definitely has to walk looking upwards when in Europe.....so many photo opportunities. When can we meet in France with our cameras?

biebkriebels said...

Always the woman who have to bear the heavy stuff, but these two look happy to do so with convenience.

Janey and Co. said...

Thanks Genie...I learned a new word today...Janey

Bibi said...

I always get a kick out of caryatids like this, with the ladies so casually supporting all that weight...

Pierre BOYER said...

J'aime beaucoup...

Pierre

Virginia said...

I'm cracking up at Paul again! The one on the right is trying to drum up a little business I think!
V

Halcyon said...

Why don't we have stuff like this in N America? So lovely!

Starman said...

Luckily, we get to enjoy the extravagance of past times because they're too expensive to be done today.

Alexa said...

LOL, Paul & Virginia! These are every bit as beautiful as the ones in Greece—and in better shape. :~} Wonder what the A in the medallion stands for. (Acropolis? Alexa? the name of the architect?)

this is Belgium said...

Excellent voyage !

Grammy Goodwill said...

New word for me today. Thanks.

Loree said...

I love them. They look so graceful.

Kris said...

Genie,

This a beautiful photo! I love the fact that they are using women as an architectural support. Pretty fitting I would say.

Kris

Konstantin said...

Beautiful. There are some caryatids in the historic center of my city too. French architects worked here before the revolution.

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

In researching this post I discovered that there are many of these in the USA and other places around the world. Most of the ones in the US are of the same vintage as seen here.

Any ideas on the "A"?

I am off to Paris in the morning and will comment on my blog with updates from my beloved city.

À bientôt!
Genie

M said...

Bon voyage chère Genie! Have a wonderful time in Paris and eat lots of patisseries, croissants, pain au chocolat, et fromage! May you wake up to a fantastic birthday on your arrival! Gros bisous!

Oh, almost forgot ... Love this photo ... We women do bear the weight o the world on our shoulders at times and these ladies personify this!

this is Belgium said...

maybe this is it? Atlantes et cariatides
ATLANTE
Ce terme grec désigne une figure humaine destinée dans l'architecture à soutenir une architrave à la place de la colonne ou du pilier; il est ainsi nommé par allusion au mythe d'Atlas, qui portait le ciel sur ses épaules.
Dans l'architecture grecque, il représente le pendant masculin de la cariatide.Il en reste quelques-uns en Grèce et en Sicile, comme à Agrigente, sur l'Olympeion (aujourd'hui renversé).

this is Belgium said...

Hope you had a safe trip, have arrived well and are recuperating from jet lag !!

Randy said...

They are just so beautiful.

LaPouyette said...

Very, very classic and so good!

karin