Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Passage Jouffroy - un mystère?




As one looks up* in Passage Jouffroy, the iron and glass ceiling catches the eye along with the lamps, ever-present for almost two centuries. For what purpose is that door and where might it lead? Is there anyone looking out over the many pedestrians of the passage each day?



If it seems that I am suggesting it is haunted or slightly askew, I have been reading Deborah Lawrenson's wonderful book, The Lantern, just published by HarperCollins in the USA. A novelist and journalist, she and her husband live in a crumbling house in the Luberon which is the inspiration for her captivating, haunting book. You can check out her blog here.


*always remember to look up


Passage Jouffroy
10-12, boulevard Montmartre
9, rue de la Grange Batelière
75009 Paris

23 comments:

Sylvia K said...

Great post for the day as always and thank you for the info re: Deborah Lawrenson's book! I'll definitely check it out and look for her book, I'm in need of some reading material right now! Have a beautiful day, mon amie!

Hugs

Sylvia

Bibi said...

Hmmm...it almost looks like a trompe l'oeil door, but I see a reflection. Perhaps once upon a time it had a small step-out terrace?

beau gosse said...

It reminds me of the milky glass doors and catwalks built into the ceiling around Grand Central Station in New York....looks like an attic storage room now. Thank you, Genie! Safe Journies Home! ^_^

Shell Sherree said...

It does have an air of mystery, Genie. Food for wandering thoughts {with the lights on, in my case ~ I'm a wuss, what can I say}. That's very exciting about Deborah's book. Bonne chance to her...

biebkriebels said...

That looks mysterious, you can imagine a whole story about the window.Maybe you should write one yourself...

Joe said...

Un mystere! .. With a slow and inconspicuous movement avoiding the creak of the hinges Count Felix de Jouffray-Gonsans closed the door above his trading hall. He was thankful they were covered in dust and appeared unused. Unrealistically he hoped that the contents of the attic beyond would remain untouched forever.

Leenamarketta said...

What a marvelously beautiful photo again Genie.

dive said...

Oooh, what a wonderful spot to sit and people-watch. A door like that deserves to be open and to have a table, some coffee and macarons and a couple of good friends sitting in it.

Harriet said...

Another captivating photo!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Such an intriguing little spot, I think it must have been used for checking out the goings on below. What a good imagination Joe has, loved his interpretation of your image Genie.

Aesthetic Alterations said...

I love that little detail--something I purposely went to see every once and a while! Your photos--they always take me back. :)

Virginia said...

Genie, have I been here??? Love love the lantern!
V

Kris said...

What a spectacular ceiling! It's so beautiful.

You have peaked my interest in The Lantern. It sounds wonderful. Have you ever read any of Kate Morton's books. The House at Riverton and The Distant Hours both have a surprising twist ending.

I think I will make that my next book purchase.

Kris

Malyss said...

Secret little places like this make the imagination run!I like the shops in this Passage, one sells fabulous dolls houses!

Starman said...

Not sure I believe in ghosts, but it is an odd place for a window/door.

Yoli said...

Beautiful photo and intriguing thoughts as to the use of that window/door. It does look like what another stated to be a storage room now but I wonder what it was two centuries ago.

Fábio Martins said...

A good composition and nice tones of colors

Alexa said...

Good for you—I saw this when I was in this passage with my blog amie Marylène (wandering 'til time to show up at Eric's for dinner, lucky us). Guess I didn't see the obvious photo op as you did!

Halcyon said...

An interesting detail! Glad you were looking up. :)

Randy said...

I love the old world feel and look. Marvelous.

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

Joe, perhaps you should be a mystery writer with your colorful descriptions. Love it!

dive, I agree and wonder if in the original plan, there was a catwalk with a railing (one hopes) for the business office beyond those doors to oversee the commerce below.... hummmm?

Yoli, I did wonder the same as you. Sadly, I imagine that it is being used as storage now. Thanks for visiting my blog and commenting. I hope you will come again!

Kris, I have not read Kate Morton's books but thanks for the recommendation.

Alexa, perhaps Eric knows more of the history and details than I have found... I will ask him.

Malyss, I did not know about the place with the doll houses... I will have to go back again!

During my trip over the past several days, I had the luxury of uninterrupted reading time. The hummmm of the jet engines kept me in my own world of The Lantern. Deborah has a winner with this intriguing book and I will enjoy watching it rise on the charts and booklists. Congratulations!

Bises,
Genie

R Keith Lambert said...

wonderful capture here.Your are very versatile with your composition and offer excellent perspective on a full range of different styles of photographs. I appreciate your work Genie. I try to visit every few days or so. Merci, Keith

This is Belgium said...

I hate to have to say it but we have the most beautiful covered gallery right here in Brussels -; and I will go take some picts to prove it, Genie !!
as to the book, glad to find out about it, curious about it too as I have looooved the Luberon
anni