Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Galerie C. T. Loo & Co.


This beautiful mandarin pagoda is an island in the midst of Hausmanian architecture very near Parc de Monceau. It was built in 1926 by the french architect Fernand Bloch for the chinese antics dealer Ching-Tsai Loo. "Starting his business in Paris, Loo was almost single-handedly responsible for introducing early Chinese art—bronzes, jades, paintings—to Western Europe and North America"....Real Parisian-50 best kept secrets

I hoped to catch a glimpse into the open window but saw neither shadow nor curious eyes. Tant pis pour moi.





Galerie C T Loo & Co

48, rue de Courcelles


31 comments:

Sylvia K said...

Beautiful it is! And what a terrific capture, Genie! I love the color! Hope your week is off to a great start, mon amie! Enjoy!

Hugs,

Sylvia

Pierre BOYER said...

:-)
Je crois que je suis déjà passé par là... Il faudrait que je m'y arrête !!!
Bonne journée,

Pierre
http://pierre-boyer.blogspot.com/

Rob-bear said...

That's quite different from much of the other architecture you've shown us, Genie. Intentionally, on the part of the designer.
Great shot.

beau gosse said...

I wonder what other antics Loo got up to, Genie?!? The architecture is a lovely contrast!

jennyfreckles said...

Thank you for your lovely and generous comments on my blog, Genie. I loved what you said about the way you use your Nikon. That's just the relationship I want with mine, a constant travelling companion, prepared to work hard!(I wonder how many lens hoods there are in the canals in Venice?!)
As to your photo today, I would not have known that was Paris. Beautiful muted colour and I like the angle you got on it.

Cezar and Léia said...

Coucou, c'est moi! :)
Hmmm amazing windows and lovely details, your picture is wonderful and I'm enchanted by the lights and shadows, I like it a lot!
bises
Léia

biebkriebels said...

I like those coloured buildings, it is a bit exotic.

This is Belgium said...

me too I think already have passed by this curious architecture for Paris... it is near the Hilton, isn't it? The remarkable thing of your blog, next to many other wonderful things, is that it attracts my attention to "stuff' that I had not noticed before

dive said...

I remember being startled by this building on my way to Parc de Monceau to photograph the strange obelisks and odd faux-classical follies that reside there.
Thank you for telling us the building's story, Genie, and for solving a mystery that has bugged me for years.

Hana de Prague said...

What gorgeous capture, Genie! I like it very much. Have you been also inside? How it was?
I discovered the pagoda by chance last Spring going to Monceau parc (my post is here http://pariz-pro-pokrocile.blog.cz/1104/cinska-pagoda).
Bises Hana

brattcat said...

but the sight of this amazing building with that window open sets our imaginations racing.

Tena Russ said...

Gorgeous facade!

Shell Sherree said...

I love that it manages to somehow give a nod to Parisian shutters, railings and symmetry, but with a distinctly oriental style.
Great angle, Genie.

Bibi said...

Gee, don't know this place. I like it.

Birdman said...

How come I like that faded pink pastel-look.?

M said...

Alas, it was not open when we went by ... Will have to save the temptation to peek inside for a return trip. Genie, your photo is wonderful! Love the enticingly open window.

Alexa said...

What an amazing find—and so beautifully captured, Genie! The lone open window really beckons, doesn't it?

Jean said...

Windows and doors- I love to photograph. this is a pure delight.

Fábio Martins said...

Beautiful old building! Interesting angle

Virginia said...

Oh this is a fun place to photograph. I posted one after the summer there. Peter and I ate at a cute cafe across the s treet so I got to gaze at it the whole meal.
V

Loree said...

What a fun-coloured building. It must stand out quite a bit.

Starman said...

It was my intention to visit this place on this trip. There is also a nice little museum just around the corner. It does not appear I will ever see either.

Alan said...

Ooh, I do like the simplicity of this shot. Just a bunch of lovely colours, shapes and lines. It reminds me of a similar shot I have from Melbourne, might post it next week.

Randy said...

Not something I would expect to see in Paris. Excellent photo.

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

Pierre, you really should stop by there and let me know if they are still in operation. The business is run (according to my research) by the two grandsons of M. Loo. I await your answer.

beau gosse, I think that Loo was instrumental in Western awareness of Chinese art and was a primary broker of Chinese art objects to the Rockefellers. It was an interesting time as the dealers and brokers generated the demand for Chinese art. He died around 1957

anni, yes, when I "mapped it" for this post, I did notice the Hilton just down the street.

dive, I think that I only scratched the surface of the history and richness within. Perhaps you can discover more. I did read that as of several years ago you could rent certain rooms for catered functions, receptions, etc.

Hana - Your photos are wonderful and really show the larger view of this architecture with some beautiful details as well. Thanks for the link!

Starman - I hope that you can make it there.

Alan - I will check out your "sister post" next week!

To all, thank you for your comments. This was a surprise to find in the midst of the more traditional buildings of the Haussman period. The color is the rich coral/red of the higher floors, the lower one appearing a bit washed out.

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Viennese Girl Vreni said...

I know this building and was very suprised when I saw it for the first time.

Harriet said...

I visited this gallery in 2002, but I haven't checked it out since then. The building is certainly an attention-getter. Nice photo.

Jack said...

It is lovely architecture and decoration. Aside from the wonderful coral color, what impresses me most is that it has traditional Chinese design elements but it also honors the size and scale of Parisian architecture, too.

R Keith Lambert said...

I like both the composition and the color of this shot. Keep up the good work.

Kelley Carey MacDonald said...

Well! Who knew? And was he actually a Chinese Antiques dealer or is there some commodity in Paris where antics are the prize?
Beautiful building. One more going on my list of "Things To See When I Return..."