Sunday, November 21, 2010

Église Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois


When the Louvre was still a royal palace (Palais du Louvre), Église Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois was its church, the former parish of the kings of France. The unusual bell tower seen here was constructed in the 12th century and is the only remaining element of that early church. It was transformed in the 19th century to its current Gothic style. The stained glass windows from the Renaissance period are magnificent and the impressive organ was originally ordered by Louis XVI for Sainte-Chapelle.

Bon dimanche



Église Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois
2, place du Louvre

20 comments:

RuneE said...

It looks like magnificent church. They knew how to get all the details and all things "just right". And you have added the perfect lighting :-)

Cezar and Léia said...

The church tower is outstanding!Thanks for all architecture information, it's so interesting!
bon dimanche!
Léia :)

Malyss said...

I was born in Paris, but don't live there anymore since (too many )years. And I like to come and stroll on your blog, discovering the way you look at it as American native..

M said...

An intricate confection of a church ... and you have focused us on all the details. Love the sky and the ray of sunshine on it. Bon dimanche a toi aussi.

hollyb said...

Great Photo! Also looks a little like Harkness Tower at Yale.

Virginia said...

Color me clueless but I've never laid eyes on this place!! How on earth? Peut-être it will be close to our apt?
V

Peter said...

Virginia missed something? :-)

... and the bells were ringing on the St. Bartholomew's day... but from the other smaller hidden tower, much less spectacular.

Harriet said...

I don't think I've seen this bell tower either. I did see a bell tower behind the Louvre but it had gargoyles at the top; I need to further investigate both on my next trip.

I love the architecture!

Picturit said...

Great looking building, they knew how to build then didn't they?

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

RuneE -- It is a magnificent church with a variety of architectural styles created over the years. The overall effect is very pleasing and interesting. Thanks for your comments... oh, and some days the lighting is just perfect for shots like this... Merci!

Léia -- It was converted to Gothic from its original Renaissance style. Merci, mes amis (Cezar aussi)

Malyss -- Please come and stroll here often and correct any errors of fact, language, or custom you find. Your blog is filled with beautiful photos and stories and I have not yet visited the southeastern coast of France.

Marie -- Merci... we will have to visit this on your next trip and I think that it is very close to where you and your DH have stayed.

Holly -- Interesting and I did not know that... Sorry that your DH's Yale lost to Harvard

Virginia -- I have my "clueless" crayon out and ready to color... Yes, it is close to the apt and I think that you and Mary walked very near this when you got kicked out of the Métro en juin. Mary has a map and can get you there en janvier.

Peter -- I checked to see if you had posted this church so I could link to it but did not find it on your blog. The history surrounding this church is quite interesting and until I researched a bit I did not know about the bells and their link to St. Bartholomew's day. Must have been a horrible scene. Merci.

Harriet -- It is difficult to see all of the churches and each one is spectacular in its own way. I want to explore "new" ones but on my visits I always must return to a few favorites (St. Madeleine for one)

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

Picturit -- Yes, and this one was built and built and built and re-built over many centuries. I think that is one thing that makes it so interesting. I wonder what the tower looked like before it was "modernized" to Gothic! Merci!

EG Wow said...

The details are amazing! The years it took to build churches way back when would be too slow for our hurry-up societies. Today, workmanship suffers. But at least we have these magnificent edifices to admire.

TheChieftess said...

I can just imagine, back in the days they were remodeling the tower from Renaissance to Gothic...the naysayers saying..."Oh! Look at that!!! Can't they just leave well enough alone? Why do they always have to modernize everything???"

What a gorgeous remodel this is!!!

T. Becque said...

Doesn't the history just knock you over?! So old and so beautiful.

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

EG Wow - I am certainly glad that all the wars and battles in Paris did not destroy beauties like this!

Chieftess -- Those were my thoughts, too. I can hear much clucking about why did we have to modernize. I think that there are a few relics left from the Renaissance period but most were destroyed along the way. Thanks for your comments.

T Becque -- Part of the benefit of posting on this blog has been the research into the history of each subject. We had no idea that the bistrot I posted earlier this week was reknown until I looked it up. Thankfully, I have always known the street and/or area for later look-up. Merci for your comments!

Sab said...

It is a truly beautiful church tower Genie. And maybe, just maybe, you can answer this UNANSWERED question on my Paris Photo Quiz... You could at least try to guess which church it is and win yourself a bookmark (hint, hint ;-)

Randy said...

Absolutely amazing. I don't think it could ever be copied.

Ninny said...

The antiquities of Europe still amaze me! Love the storm clouds in the photo, too.

Liz

JM said...

Not only the tower is a beauty but also the light and the contrast to the dark sky behind it.

Sab said...

Hi Genie, and thanks for trying the quiz - but you have to guess, at least the church, and the bookmarks are yours ;-)